Food Adventures – Pigs in a Blanket

This name gives my stomach a hard time – it makes me shudder and want to cry and become hungry all at the same time.

I wonder if there is a vegetarian version….

Image

But it wouldn’t taste the same, no doubt.

I had no idea how to make this recipe before today, but I was craving it continuously, so I got sausages from the store and opened up five tabs with different recipes for “crescent hot dogs”. Some of them requried puff pastry, which I did not have, and all of them were different, so I ended up combining elements from several to make this recipe. The results are rather magnificent.

Image

The dough

  • 2 1/4 cups flour (I am off gluten, so I used quinoa flour – this worked fine)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 3-4 tbsp oil (melted butter should work too)

The sauce/dip

  • 3/4 cup mustard
  • 1 heaped tsp of honey

Other

  • mini sausages, cooked (I bought two packs of six long ones, which I each cut into half. I had 6 halves left over in the end)
  • sesame seeds (or other seeds, to your liking)
  • 1 egg + 1 tbsp water, for glaze

Combine the flour and salt in a bowl. Briefly beat the milk, oil, and egg together in a separate bowl, then mix into the flour mixture. Combine until the dough sticks together, then turn over onto a floured surface, and mould until it forms one ball.

Notes: don’t be afraid to work the dough! Unlike delicate puff or pastry dough, this scone-type dough can be worked as much as it needs to be without fear or ruining it. You may need to add extra milk or flour if it is too floury or too sticky.

Roll the dough out into a rectangle. Turn it so that the long side is horizontal to your vision, and cut the dough vertically into three segments. Cut each of those columns into three pieces horizontally, so you have nine sort-of rectangles (squares would work fine too, so the shape isn’t that important!) Cut each of the squares diagonally so you have 18 triangles.

At this point, I would start preheating the oven. Most of the recipes said 400 degrees F, but I think it may have worked a little better if the temperature was a little lower (around 350-375 degrees) and the rolls baked a little longer. The edges started looking almost burnt quite soon, so maybe baking for longer would have let it brown more evenly. (All of the dough was still well baked, though!)

Now it’s time to put the sauce on! Spread it only on one side of the triangle – you need one of the vertexes to be clean so that the dough can stick to itself when you wrap up the sausage. After you smeared some sauce on the dough, put a sausage along one of the sides of the triangle, and wrap it up, pressing the vertex into the dough once it’s wrapped, so it doesn’t unroll in the oven. Once all the sausages are wrapped, put them on a baking tray laid with parchment paper, beat the egg with 1 tbsp of water for the glaze, and brush on the tops of the rolls. Sprinkle some sesame seeds (or ones to your taste) overtop, and into the oven they go for 12-15 minutes, or until the dough is golden brown on the edges!

I found the dough a little dry in the end, so perhaps the remaining sauce could be used as a dip for extra moisture and flavour  Or perhaps I missed something with the dough – if any readers have ideas for improvement, please leave a comment! 🙂